Britain and the G8: A champion of the world’s poor?

Mark Curtis Chapter in Gill Hubbard and David Miller (eds), Arguments against G8, Pluto, London, 2005, available at http://www.plutobooks.com/cgi-local/nplutobrows.pl?chkisbn=0745324207&main=&second=&third=&foo=../ssi/ssfooter.ssi In 2005, Britain is hosting (or by the time you read this book will have hosted) the summit meeting of the G8 countries in Gleneagles, Scotland. New Labour ministers have been clamouring to publicly demonstrate their commitment […]

Stop the war

Mark Curtis  Contribution to Andrew Murray and Lindsey German, Stop the War: The story of Britain’s biggest mass movement, Bookmarks, 2005 – available at http://www.word-power.co.uk/catalogue/1905192002 Anyone who believes that the protest movement against the Iraq war was a failure should consider the Blair’s government’s military planning. Over the last seven years the government has been developing […]

The war in Oman, 1957-59

By Mark Curtis An edited extract from Unpeople: Britain’s Secret Human Rights Abuses In July 1957 an uprising in central Oman brought about a collapse in the Sultan’s authority in the area and threatened control of the country as a whole. Various tribes defecting from the Sultan joined forces with another tribal leader, Talib, who […]

Britain’s postwar foreign policy: A web of deceit

by Mark Curtis A chapter in Prem Poddar and David Johnson (eds), A Historical Companion to Postcolonial Thought in English, Columbia University Press, 2005, available here: The standard view is that Britain’s postwar foreign policy has aimed to promote democracy, peace, human rights and overseas development. If these supposed goals are not always explicitly outlined […]

Why I believe academics have failed the general public

by Mark Curtis Times Higher Education Supplement, 1 October 2004 My view is that the reality of Britain’s foreign policy is very different than usually presented by academics. Indeed, I think British academics are generally responsible for keeping students and the public in ignorance about this country’s real role in the world. Explicit or implicit […]

The covert war in Yemen, 1962-70

The covert war in Yemen – 1962-70 By Mark Curtis An edited extract from Unpeople: Britain’s Secret Human Rights Abuses In September 1962, the Imam of North Yemen was overthrown in a popular coup. Imam al-Badr had been in power for only a week having succeeded his father who had presided over a feudal kingdom […]

The US war in Vietnam, 1961-73

By Mark Curtis An edited extract from Unpeople: Britain’s Secret Human Rights Abuses The declassified British files on the Vietnam war are little short of a revelation. They show that Britain totally backed the US at virtually every stage of military escalation, and also played its own important secret role in the war.  During the […]

The rise of Idi Amin in Uganda, 1971-72

By Mark Curtis An edited extract from Unpeople: Britain’s Secret Human Rights Abuses The declassified British files tell us first that British officials were delighted to see the back of the government of Milton Obote that Amin overthrew. Eleven days before Amin’s coup on 25 January 1971, Britain’s High Commissioner in Kampala, Richard Slater, ran […]

Nigeria’s war over Biafra, 1967-70

Nigeria’s war over Biafra, 1967-70 By Mark Curtis An edited extract from Unpeople: Britain’s Secret Human Right Abuses The formerly secret files on the Nigerian civil war in the late 1960s show very clear British complicity in the Nigerian government’s aggression against the region of Biafra, where an independence movement was struggling to secede from […]

The war in Malaya, 1948-60

By Mark Curtis An edited extract from Web of Deceit: Britain’s Real Role in the World “The hard core of armed communists in this country are fanatics and must be, and will be, exterminated”. (Sir Gerald Templer, High Commissioner in colonial Malaya) Between 1948 and 1960 the British military fought what is conventionally called the […]