A real power struggle

The Guardian, 18 October 2006 Addressing overseas development without discussing the regulation of big business is like talking about malaria without mentioning mosquitoes. Yet New Labour’s supposed commitment to eradicating global poverty does not even pretend to seek to rein

New Labour and international development

Speech to the European Social Forum, London, 15 October 2004 Mark Curtis There is a great myth currently being peddled not only here but elsewhere in Europe – that the British government has a positive development agenda and is a

Britain and the G8: A champion of the world’s poor?

Mark Curtis Chapter in Gill Hubbard and David Miller (eds), Arguments against G8, Pluto, London, 2005, available at http://www.plutobooks.com/cgi-local/nplutobrows.pl?chkisbn=0745324207&main=&second=&third=&foo=../ssi/ssfooter.ssi In 2005, Britain is hosting (or by the time you read this book will have hosted) the summit meeting of the G8

Unpeople: Britain’s Secret Human Rights Abuses

Britain complicit in the deaths of ten million people since 1945. Those are Unpeople – those whose lives are seen as expendable in the pursuit of Britain’s economic and political goals. Historian Mark Curtis pieces together the Blair government’s “public

The future of the “anti-globalisation” movement post-September 11th

Debate between Mark Curtis and John Lloyd The Ecologist, 22 February 2002 Dear Mark, My argument is that 11 September has made the global movements of protest even less intellectually sustainable than they were before. I am not arguing that

Web of Deceit

Britain’s Real Role in the World. In his explosive new book, Mark Curtis reveals a new picture of Britain’s role in the world since 1945 and in the “war against terrorism” by offering a comprehensive critique of the Blair government’s

Trade For Life: Making Trade Work for Poor People

A Christian Aid book by Mark Curtis. Across the world, poor people are suffering as a result of the current global trade system. For a decade trade rules have been negotiated through the World Trade Organisation (WTO). They cover not

The Great Deception

Anglo-American Power and World Order. Debunking some of the myths of post-cold War power, Mark Curtis demonstrates how Britain remains the key supporting player in US domination, and how far from benign that domination is in its impact on the

Britain and Africa: The aid dividend

by Mark Curtis Red Pepper, March 2005 A major feature of the invasion of Iraq was media commentators falling for obvious government propaganda. Without such complicity, the invasion would have been politically impossible. Yet this willful self-deception is now being

Brown’s doleful role at Gleneagles

by Mark Curtis Guardian, 9 July 2005 The government will try to pull off a PR coup in the aftermath of the G8 summit by posturing as Africa’s champion – hiding Britain’s real agenda and how agreements on debt and